News

Richard Mizelle was one of the editors of Resilience and Opportunity: Lessons from the U.S. Gulf Coast after Katrina and Rita, published by Brookings Institution Press. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita devastated the Gulf Coast in 2005. Commentary and analysis typically focused on what went wrong in the post-disaster emergency response. This forward-looking book, however, presents a more cautiously optimistic view about the region’s ability to bounce back after multiple disasters.

Elna Green was given the Thompson Award for her article "Hidden in Plain View: Eugene Poulnot and the History of Southern Radicalism," which was judged the best article published in the Florida Historical Quarterly during the calendar year 2006.  In presenting the award, the editors noted, "The committee cited the depth of the research, the presentation of new material and the clarity of writing as reasons for choosing this article for the award."

Charles Upchurch published Before Wilde: Sex Between Men in Britain’s Age of Reform with University of California Press. "This book fills an aching gap in the history of male homosexuality in Britain, the mid-years of the nineteenth century. Charles Upchurch shows the importance of this period in foreshadowing what was to come in the greater dramas of the late century, signaled by Wilde's disastrous fall. But more than this, the book refuses to see homosexuality as a thing apart. Its history is firmly located in a dense history of families, communities, rapid change, new forms of policing, and social reform. The result is a compelling account that illuminates dark corners, and throws new light on the familiar. It is a major contribution to our understanding of sex between men in a period of dramatic change."—Jeffrey Weeks, author of The World We Have Won: The Remaking of Erotic and Intimate Life

Frederick R. Davis published The Man Who Saved Sea Turtles: Archie Carr and the Origins of Conservation Biology with Oxford University Press.  "Davis gives us a picture of what it meant to be a naturalist in the twentieth century, and he ties Carr to the long tradition of naturalists going back to Linnaeus. But he does a lot more. He ties natural history to ecology, environmental science, and conservation biology. Carr is a perfect subject for doing this, and the book gives a wonderful picture of how closely these subjects are interrelated."-- Paul Farber, Professor of History of Science, Oregon State University

Graduate student Kevin Kokomoor won the 2010 Arthur W. Thompson Award for the most outstanding article in the Florida Historical Quarterly in 2009. “A Re-assessment of Seminoles, Africans, and Slavery on the Florida Frontier,” appeared in the Fall of 2009, Volume 88, no.2.

Jonathan Grant published Rulers, Guns, and Money: The Global Arms Trade in the Age of Imperialism with Harvard University Press.  "An ambitious and wide-ranging history of the arms export trade over the half century leading up to the First World War. Grant provides a great deal of new information on unfamiliar topics, such as the Argentina-Chile naval race of the 1890s and Ethiopian emperor Menilek's purchase of European rifles. He also offers fresh material on better-known episodes, such as the modernization of Meiji Japan and arms sales to the Balkans." --David Stevenson, London School of Economics and Political Science

Producer Mark Baker used the Reichelt Oral History Program’s collection of interviews on the history of the Florida Park Service as background for The Story of Florida’s State Parks, a three-part television series that chronicles the dramatic times and remarkable characters behind the formation of Florida’s award winning state park system. A compelling narrative and untold stories are visualized through high definition images of the wonders of the state parks.

Andy Bruno (Ph.D. University of Illinois, 2011) will be joining the Department of History at FSU as a Postdoctoral Fellow in 2011-12 before becoming an Assistant Professor at Northern Illinois University. The postdoc is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF ARC 0922651) and under the supervision of Prof. Ronald E. Doel. Bruno's research focuses on Soviet environmental history. He has published several articles and book chapters, including one in the International Review of Social History

Edward Gray published The Making of John Ledyard: Empire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler with Yale University Press.  "Daring, ambitious, and theatrical, John Ledyard seems to step out of a great eighteenth-century novel into this vivid and revealing history. Following Ledyard's clues, Edward Gray draws readers through a compelling and global story of ambition, adventure, and empire."—Alan Taylor, author of The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution.  “Ledyard’s career opens up the entire world, in the most literal sense. His is a really grand story, one that transcends all sorts of conventional boundaries.”—Edward Countryman, Southern Methodist University

Jennifer Lisa Koslow published Cultivating Health: Los Angeles Women and Public Health Reform with Rutgers University Press. "An original and fine-grained study of the far-reaching activities and impact of an early generation of white affluent female reformers in a rapidly growing multicultural West Coast metropolis. This book adds rich detail and depth to our understanding of the history of Progressive-era Los Angeles, urban reform, public health, and women's volunteerism."—American Historical Review