Jennifer L. Koslow

Koslow photo
Jennifer L.
Koslow
Associate Professor of History
Phone
850.644.5888

Before joining the faculty at Florida State University, Jennifer Koslow worked as the Assistant Director of the Dr. William M. Scholl Center for Family and Community History at the Newberry Library in Chicago. At the Newberry, Prof. Koslow worked to promote the use of the collections. She organized exhibits, scholarly works-in-progress seminars, and professional development programs for secondary school teachers of history.

As the assistant curator on Outspoken, Prof. Koslow spent a year producing a collaborative exhibit between the Newberry and Chicago Historical Society of over 120 items detailing Chicago's free speech tradition. She was also the lead instructor for two federally funded Teaching American History grants (the Chicago History Project and Connecting with American History). In these programs she worked closely with history educators from the Chicago Metro History Education Center, the Chicago Historical Society, and the Constitutional Rights Foundation in Chicago. In addition to working with history educators and teachers in Chicago, as a graduate student Prof. Koslow assisted faculty at UCLA in creating online materials for their courses. She continues to be interested in thinking about the various ways we might use the web in the study of history.

Prof. Koslow’s Cultivating Health: Los Angeles Women and Public Health Reform (New Brunswick, N.J.: University of Rutgers Press (2009) explores why women, instead of city officials, took charge of public health. It looks at how women used science and maternalism to argue for an expanded role for government and citizen action. In addition, the book analyzes how negotiations within homes between patients and reformers shaped the character and expression of Los Angeles' s public health infrastructure. This work has been supported by the National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health, the Huntington Library, the Historical Society of Southern California, the UCLA History Department, the UCLA Center for the Study of Women, and the American Historical Association. Her second project is a social history of exhibits and public health.