News

Department Chair Neil Jumonville published two books: The New York Intellectuals Reader with Routledge and Liberalism for a New Century with the University of California Press.

Darrin McMahon will spend 2011 in Berlin.  Every year, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation enables more than 2,000 researchers from all over the world to spend time researching in Germany. The Foundation maintains a network of more than 24,000 Humboldtians from all disciplines in over 130 countries worldwide, including 43 Nobel Prize winners.

The Guadalajara Census Project, under the direction of Rodney Anderson, released its CD Volume 1: The Guadalajara Censuses of 1821 and 1822.

Robert Gellately published Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler: The Age of Social Catastrophe with Knopf.  "Sensible and sophisticated, scholarly and very readable.  It's time to rip up the accepted versions of this terrible period and analyze it on the evidence that we now have.  Gellately has done just that."  -- Simon Sebag Montefiore, The Washington Post.  "Mr. Gellately sets a high standard for anyone writing about comparative dictatorship...Lucid prose and vivid examples make the book admirable accessible to non-specialists.  But it also engages expertly in one of the most closely fought historiographical battles of past decades."  -- The Economist

The jury of the 2011 Tallahassee/Leon County Historic Preservation Awards recognizes “In FSU’s Shadow,” which was an HAPH graduate student project to build awareness of endangered historic sites in the region neighboring Florida State University, as an outstanding achievement in the Preservation Education/Media Category.

Elna Green was given the Thompson Award for her article "Hidden in Plain View: Eugene Poulnot and the History of Southern Radicalism," which was judged the best article published in the Florida Historical Quarterly during the calendar year 2006.  In presenting the award, the editors noted, "The committee cited the depth of the research, the presentation of new material and the clarity of writing as reasons for choosing this article for the award."

Charles Upchurch published Before Wilde: Sex Between Men in Britain’s Age of Reform with University of California Press. "This book fills an aching gap in the history of male homosexuality in Britain, the mid-years of the nineteenth century. Charles Upchurch shows the importance of this period in foreshadowing what was to come in the greater dramas of the late century, signaled by Wilde's disastrous fall. But more than this, the book refuses to see homosexuality as a thing apart. Its history is firmly located in a dense history of families, communities, rapid change, new forms of policing, and social reform. The result is a compelling account that illuminates dark corners, and throws new light on the familiar. It is a major contribution to our understanding of sex between men in a period of dramatic change."—Jeffrey Weeks, author of The World We Have Won: The Remaking of Erotic and Intimate Life

Frederick R. Davis published The Man Who Saved Sea Turtles: Archie Carr and the Origins of Conservation Biology with Oxford University Press.  "Davis gives us a picture of what it meant to be a naturalist in the twentieth century, and he ties Carr to the long tradition of naturalists going back to Linnaeus. But he does a lot more. He ties natural history to ecology, environmental science, and conservation biology. Carr is a perfect subject for doing this, and the book gives a wonderful picture of how closely these subjects are interrelated."-- Paul Farber, Professor of History of Science, Oregon State University

Graduate student Kevin Kokomoor won the 2010 Arthur W. Thompson Award for the most outstanding article in the Florida Historical Quarterly in 2009. “A Re-assessment of Seminoles, Africans, and Slavery on the Florida Frontier,” appeared in the Fall of 2009, Volume 88, no.2.

Jonathan Grant published Rulers, Guns, and Money: The Global Arms Trade in the Age of Imperialism with Harvard University Press.  "An ambitious and wide-ranging history of the arms export trade over the half century leading up to the First World War. Grant provides a great deal of new information on unfamiliar topics, such as the Argentina-Chile naval race of the 1890s and Ethiopian emperor Menilek's purchase of European rifles. He also offers fresh material on better-known episodes, such as the modernization of Meiji Japan and arms sales to the Balkans." --David Stevenson, London School of Economics and Political Science