Graduate Course Descriptions

American History (AMH)

AMH 5118. Colonial American History to 1763 (3). A study and comparison of the founding and development of the English colonies in North America.

AMH 5139. Revolutionary America, 1760 to 1788 (3). History of the coming, progress, and effects of the American Revolution.

AMH 5149. Thomas Jefferson's America (3). A study of the political, economic, and social development of the United States from 1800 to 1865, with particular emphasis on the Industrial Revolution and the rise of sectionalism. Historical literature of the period will also be discussed.

AMH 5177. The Civil War Era (3). In-depth study of the twenty years from 1845 to 1865. Emphasis will be placed on the coming of the Civil War, the secession crisis and on both the military and non-military events of the war years.

AMH 5178. Post Civil War, 1865-1890 (3). An analysis of post-Civil War America with emphasis on the black role in American society and the attempt to heal the wounds of the Civil War. Other topics include the rise of big business, labor unions, and the last frontier.

AMH 5229. U.S. Progressive Era, 1890-1920 (3). Includes a study of the development of domestic and foreign policy, the revolution of social thought, and the paradoxical path of reform in urbanized, industrial America. Devotes special attention to the nation's effort to accommodate old values with new realities.

AMH 5239. The United States, 1920-1945: Prosperity, Depression, and World War II (3). A general course in United States history from 1920 through 1945, (i.e. a study of political, economic, diplomatic, military, social, and cultural/intellectual developments during that period).

AMH 5279. The United States Since 1945 (3). Examines America's role as a super power, including its involvement in two Asian wars. Shows how affluence and Cold War anxieties shaped American society, and delineates the nation's struggle to deal with inequality, poverty, violence, abuses of power, and finally, its own limitations.

AMH 5336. U.S. Intellectual History I: Beginning to 1880 (3). An interdisciplinary study of American thought from the Puritans to the late 19th century, asking, among other questions, what mission American assigned itself. Among the ideas examined will be Puritanism, the Revolutionary ideology, federalism, the American Enlightenment, romanticism, individualism, and manifest destiny.

AMH 5337. U.S. Intellectual History II: 1880 to the Present (3). An interdisciplinary study of the impact on American thought of social Darwinism, industrialism, naturalism, the culture of consumption, radicalism, anticommunism, postindustrialism, and affluence. Examines the growth of cultural criticism as a task required of the 20th-century intellectual.

AMH 5404. The Old South (3). A study of the social and economic development of the Southern states from settlement by Europeans to the end of the Civil War with emphasis on the rise of the Cotton Kingdom and the causes of Secession.

AMH 5405. The South Since 1865 (3). Views the South both as a distinct region and as an area gradually coming back into "regular" American life after the Civil War. The unique problems of adjusting to defeat, the revolution in the labor system, and troubled race relations are considered.

AMH 5424. History of Florida From 1821 to the Present (3). A history of Florida from the period of its acquisition from Spain in 1821 until the present. The various "periods" in the state's past are discussed and major attention is given to the period 1920 to the present - the period of greatest growth.

AMH 5447. History of Frontier to 1865 (3). Examines the Westward Movement from 1763 until 1865. Social political, economic, and military aspects of the frontier experience and the significance of the frontier in American history are examined.

AMH 5469. Urban America Since 1879 (3). The development of American cities and the attempts to deal with changing urban problems from 1879 to the present.

AMH 5517. U.S. Foreign Relations to 1900 (3). Acquaints students with the major interpretations of America's rise to world power and provides them with training in the use of primary sources.

AMH 5518. 20th Century U.S. Foreign Relations (3). Students become a acquainted with the major schools of interpretation regarding American foreign policy in the twentieth century and gain research and writing experience.

AMH 5555. American Legal History I (3). Surveys the history of the U.S. Constitution to 1800, including the British background, the first state constitutions, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitutional Convention, ratification debates, and first use of the Constitution in the 1790s. In concludes with the first major controversies faced by the founders, issues that the Constitution did not resolve for them easily. The course is not about constitutional interpretation or theories applied by the current Supreme Court.

AMH 5556. American Legal History II (3). Surveys the history of the U.S. Constitution and American law in the 19th century. Topics include the Marshall Court, slave law and the Dred Scott decision, impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on law, and the effects of industrialization on American law. The course is not about constitutional interpretation or theories applied by the current Supreme Court.

AMH 5563. Women in 19th Century America (3). This course examines the experiences of women in 19th century America, focusing on ways gender, race, ethnicity, class, religion and region interacted to shape women's lives. Course examines women's family, work, social, and political roles, women's contributions, and quest for equality.

AMH 5564. Women in Modern America (3). Examines the experiences and contributions of women in twentieth century America, with particular attention to the forces that served to differentiate the opportunities and roles of women from those of their male peers.

AMH 5576. Black America to 1877 (3). This course begins with the African background of black Americans and ends with the final curtailment of Reconstruction in 1877. Although some portions of the course are topical, cutting across chronological divisions, there will be a general chronological progression from colonial times to the end of Reconstruction.

AMH 5577. Black America Since 1877 (3). Traces the social, economic, cultural and political activities of African-Americans from reconstruction through the Civil Rights Movement.

AMH 5645. Humor and the American Mind (3). A course in American intellectual and cultural history from the 18th century to the present, through the lens of humor. Investigates the relationship between American ideas and historical transformations. Uses humor to explore the connections and tensions between the various parts of the American mind.

 

African & Asian History (AFH/ASH)

AFH 5308. Northern African History (3). This course will concentrate on the modern history of North Africa including: the Maghrib, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, the Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somalia. It is intended to provide an understanding of the background and problems of some North African states today.

ASH 5226. Modern Middle East (3). An examination of modern Middle Eastern history, focusing on the origins of recent problems in the imperialistic era, the clash of political and cultural traditions, national rivalries, the impact of OPEC, the Palestinians, and the Iranian Revolution.

ASH 5406. China to 1898 (3). A study of China from Han through the Hundred Days' Reform of 1898.

ASH 5408. China Since 1898 (3). A study of China from the Boxer Uprising through the Kuomintang and Communist Revolutions.

ASH 5529. Traditional India (3). Deals with the history of India from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Puts special emphasis not only on the study of Indian religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, but also on the roles played by various important ancient and medieval kings.

ASH 5539. Modern India (3). An introduction to the history of India from the eighteenth century to the present. Deals in depth with the impact of British rule on India and the lives of modern South Asian leaders like Gandhi, Nehru, and Jinnah.

ASH 5992. Central Asia Since the Mongols (3). This course covers Central Asian history through the medieval and modern periods, with a special emphasis on the political and ethnic histories of the Central Asian peoples.

 

European History (EUH)

EUH 5125. The Crusades (3). Provides a historical understanding of the material and spiritual bases for the reentry of Western Christendom into the Mediterranean world, the ways in which the Crusaders organized, financed, and participated in Crusades and the impact this had on European institution and thought, the interrelations of Christians (East and West) and the Muslim world in the period of the Crusades.

EUH 5127. Earlier Middle Ages (3). Provides a survey of European history from c. 300 to c. 1150, from the origins of the medieval world in the Roman, Christian, and Germanic past through the gradual emergence of a distinctively European civilization to its first major period of expansion and accomplishment.

EUH 5128. Later Middle Ages (3). Provide a survey of European history from c. 1150 to c. 1500, from the height of medieval civilization in Europe through the crises of the late Middle Ages to the Recovery leading to a new age.

EUH 5238. Rise of Nationalism (3). Analyzes the European struggle toward democracy and nationalism from the collapse of Napoleonic Europe to the establishment of the German Empire, emphasizing the development of liberalism, socialism, communism, etc.

EUH 5246. The First World War: Europe From Hegemony to Decline (3). European history from 1870 to 1918, a period which begins with the European powers at the height of their wealth and power and ends with them severely weakened. Particular attention will be paid to the origins of the First World War and the wartime experience.

EUH 5249. The Holocaust in Historical Perspective (3). This course details the background and career of the Holocaust as well as the continuing problem of "Holocaust denial." Special emphasis is given to the ideas of such racists as de Gobineau and Hitler.

EUH 5285. Europe in the Cold War and Detente (3). Deals with the post-World War II era in Europe, tracing occupation policies, the division of Europe east and west, the development of the major European states, and the efforts to arrive at detente in respect to East-West tensions.

EUH 5338. History of East Central Europe, 1815-Present (3). Examines the social, political, economic, and cultural development of the lands traditionally known as Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and the Baltic States from the Congress of Vienna to the present. Wherever possible, attempts will be made to present issues within a comparative framework.

EUH 5365. The Balkans Since 1700 (3). The course of Balkan history emphasizing the penetration of the Hapsburg and Russian empires, the decay of the Ottomans, and the emergence of the Balkan states after the wars of liberation, with stress on the cultural peculiarities of the various ethnic groups.

EUH 5457. The Age of the French Revolution, 1715-1795 (3). A study of the eighteenth century and its transformation by the forces unleashed by the French Revolution. The radicalization of the Revolution is traced to the Terror and the overthrow of Robespierre's dictatorship.

EUH 5458. Napoleonic Europe, 1795-1815 (3). Traces the rise of Napoleon and his impact - political, social, economic, military, etc. - on France and Europe, culminating in his defeat at Waterloo.

EUH 5467. Nazi Germany (3). Deals with the background of the Nazi regime, the character of Hitler's dictatorship, and the origins and course of World War II in its European context. Also examined is National Socialism's impact on German institutions and racial consequences.

EUH 5507. England in the Middle Ages (3). History of England from Anglo-Saxon settlements to the establishment of the Tudor dynasty. Covers all significant aspects of life in medieval England, but emphasis is on growth of English common law, the constitution, and administrative structures.

EUH 5509. Modern Britain Since 1870 (3). This course investigates the social, cultural and political history of Great Britain from approximately 1870 to the present. Major themes include the evolution of class structures, new cultural trends, and changing political culture, ideologies and institutions, as well as the relationship between these perspectives. Historiographical themes appropriate to the course will also be explored.

EUH 5516. Tudor England (3). The history of England from the late fifteenth century to 1603. Substantive attention will be given to the history of Scotland and Ireland in this period and to political thought, culture, and literature.

EUH 5518. Stuart England (3). A Study of England and Scotland under their joint sovereigns, the Stuart kings, from 1603 to 1714, as well as the parallel period of English rule in Ireland, the culture of the period, and its literature and political thought (Harrington, Hobbes, and Locke in particular).
EUH 5527. England, 1714-1870 (3). This course investigates the social, cultural and political history of Great Britain from 1714 to approximately 1870. Major themes include the evolution of social structures; new cultural trends; changing political culture, ideologies and institutions; and the relationship between these perspectives. Historiographical themes appropriate to the course will also be explored.

EUH 5578. Nineteenth Century Russia (3). An examination of the history of Russia from 1801 to the beginning of the 20th century, with emphasis on foreign relations and the development of the political and social conflicts that resulted in the revolutions of 1917.

EUH 5579. Twentieth Century Russia (3). Examines the social economic, cultural, and international as well as political development of Russia from the final years of Tsarist rule through the Bolshevik Revolution to its emergence as one of the world's superpowers in the 1980s.

EUH 5608. European Intellectual History, 1500-1800 (3). History of ideas documenting transition from "Medieval Mind" to "Modern Mind" including impact of four Renaissances, Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Age of Enlightenment. Inter-disciplinary approach includes philosophy, literature, art, political theory, science, economic thought, religion, and music.

EUH 5609. European Intellectual History, 1800 to Present (3). History of ideas in the last two hundred years, exploring nineteenth century as Age of "Isms" (including Liberalism, Conservatism, Communism, Romanticism, Idealism, Nationalism, Industrialism, Imperialism, Positivism, Darwinism, Historicism) and establishing the 20th century as Age of Crisis in which traditional Western Civilization disintegrates.

 

Latin American History (LAH)

LAH 5439. History of Mexico (3). Covers the history of Mexico from the great Indian empires to the present, emphasizing the 19th and 20th centuries. Deals with cultural and social history as well as political movements. Also treats Mexican historiography.

LAH 5475. History of the Caribbean (3). A survey of the history of the Latin American Caribbean. Special attention given to such topics as the Cuban Revolution and recent United States-Puerto Rican relations.

LAH 5609. History of Brazil (3). The history of Latin America's largest and most populous nation from its colonial origins to the present. Special topics such as recent democratic and authoritarian political regimes and the role of the military are treated in detail.

LAH 5727. Race/Class in Colonial Latin America (3). Comprehensive examination of Latin America from 1492 to 1830, with emphasis on native and African reactions to colonial rule and the creation and growth of multi-ethnic groups and their solidification into classes.

LAH 5749. Social Revolutionary Movements in Latin America (3). Thematic coverage of the history of social revolutionary movements in Latin America, studying such revolutions as the Mexican, Cuban, and Bolivian examples. Special emphasis on the historiography of revolutions within and outside the area.

 

Historical Administration (HIS)

HIS 5077. Oral History (3). Exposes students to use of oral history as a research technique and provides experience in conducting professional oral history interviews. Prerequisite: HIS 5932, Tutorial in Oral History.

HIS 5082. Archives Management (3). The nature of archives; various types of records; arranging and processing archives; restoring and protecting records; archival institutions, policies, and procedures.

HIS 5083. Historic Sites Identification and Preservation (3). The identification, preservation, and maintenance of historic sites; the historic preservation movement.

HIS 5084. Museums Management (3). The history and purposes of museums; problems of operation; types of exhibits and programs; publications and other interpretive devices; public relations; basic budgetary procedures.

HIS 5085r. Internship in Historical Management (3-8). (S/U grade only.) A professional apprenticeship, usually with the Florida Division of Archives, History and Records Management, designed to give students a practical introduction to the work of the historian in various fields. May be repeated to a maximum of eight (8) semester hours.

HIS 5932. Tutorial in Oral History (1). Prerequisite to HIS 5077

HIS 6055. Intro to Public History (3). A survey of the basic skills and techniques essential to researching and writing of history for professional journals, historical agencies, museums, the National Park Service, and other governmental entities. An introduction to topics such as local designation and management of historic districts, grant writing, oral history, and historic archaeology.

 

Other History Courses (HIS/WOH)

HIS 5256. War & the Nation-State (3).

HIS 5935r. Special Topics (3). Offers (not for seminars or colloquia) highly concentrated courses of a topical nature or examines specific segments of national or regional histories not covered in graduate courses or in depth in the fields or European, American, Asian, or Latin American history. May be repeated for a maximum of sixty-four (64) hours when topics and content change.

HIS 6059. Historical Methods (3). Offers a survey of the basic skills essential to the study and perfection of history. Emphasis is placed on developing writing techniques, organizing papers, research methods, and quantitative methodology.

HIS 6148. American Historiography (3). A study of American historians from Parkman to the present. Treats historians as thinkers who contributed to the larger themes and debates of American intellectual history. An examination of the progression of historical "schools" and their arguments with each other over historical and political assumptions.

HIS 6934r. Special Topics in History (3). Offers (usually in a seminar or colloquium format) highly concentrated courses of a topical nature or examines specific segments of national or regional histories not covered in graduate courses or in depth in the fields or European, American, Asian, or Latin American history. May be repeated for a maximum of sixty-four (64) hours when topics and content change.

HIS 6941. Teaching History at the College Level (3). Designed to familiarize history students with the practical aspects of classroom teaching and to provide some understanding of the philosophical and theoretical approaches to the teaching of history.

WOH 5246. World War II (3). Deals with World War II on a global basis, avoiding the common Euro-centric approach. Analyzes the character of the Pacific theater as well as that of the European War, presenting the student with insights into and contrasts between the various belligerents.

 

Science, Technology, Environment, and Medicine

 

Undergraduate Courses
HIS 3464. The History of Science (3). Reveals the many ways in which the analytical categories of race, class, gender, and ethnicity have played a role in the modern science. By directly engaging the dynamic between science and society, The History of Modern Science provides students with a deeper understanding of science and society as well as race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
AMH 4634. Florida Environmental History (3). Applies the methods and approaches of environmental history to Florida. Considers the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. Explores how nature has helped to shape culture as well as how humans have modified the natural world and transformed the land.
AMH 4630. North American Environmental History (3). Introduces the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world in America through time. Considers the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. Explores how nature has helped to shape culture as well as how humans have modified the natural world and transformed the land.
WOH 4235. Disease, Race & Environment (3). Examines the close relationship between disease, race, and environment in the development of civilizations of the world.

Graduate Courses
AMH 5635. Florida Environmental History (3). Applies the methods and approaches of environmental history to Florida. Considers the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. Explores how nature has helped to shape culture as well as how humans have modified the natural world and transformed the land.
AMH 5636. North American Environmental History (3). Introduces the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world in America through time. Considers the changing relationships between human beings and the natural world through time. Explores how nature has helped to shape culture as well as how humans have modified the natural world and transformed the land.
WOH 5238. Disease, Race & Environment (3). Examines the close relationship between disease, race, and environment in the development of civilizations of the world.
HIS 6469. Historiography and Science (3). Introduces graduate students to the range of scholarship within the history of science. Reveals the full sweep of the study of science and society by examining studies of various scientific disciplines and time periods.
HIS 6500. History of Life Sciences (3). Considers the development of life sciences from 1750 to the present. The course will introduce students to critical problems related to biology and society through the study of primary and secondary sources.

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